Destiny 2 Trailer: Snark, Splendor and the CGI cut-scene that gives us some direction for the future fight against Gary

Bungie and Activision have finally dropped their official announcement on Destiny 2.  They started off with a very clever teaser trailer that focuses on Cayde-6, drinking in a bar with our boy Sweeps, the sweeper bot from the tower, as he recounts his heroics in battle, which presumably took place just moments before he poured his drink.  His self bravado get punctuated by a high velocity round blowing out the side of the building he is in as Sweeps, my own name as I do not think any of them actually have names, looks up in shock as a new mess is made and goes to start cleaning up while Cayde picks up his pistol and starts to make his way towards the still ongoing fight further up the road, while commander Zavala yells at him over the com. Extremely well done and sets the mood for their full trailer reveal.

The full trailer gives us a much better picture of what is going on. The Traveler has taken a beating, and is potentially dead, our ghosts are nowhere to be found, and the bloody Cabal have invaded the last city of earth, destroyed the tower and blew up all our stuff! This heinous act of is perpetrated by none other than. . . . GARY!, no wait. GHAUL! A Primus, at least, of the Red Legion is the antagonist we have to face off against, and he brings with him a seemingly host of new enemies to battle. While only a CG trailer, we do see some sort of reptilian dog creatures and some huge melee based warriors who wield two large cleaver’s charged with energy. We also see variations on more traditional enemy units like the Cabal Phalanx, as their traditionally ‘iron slab’ shields have been changed to an expanding energy shield.

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Visually this trailer looks pretty awesome, there is no denying that, however it doesn’t actually give us a ton of concrete information, and there is just a lot of speculation as to how the story will unfold. If, like me, you enjoy the lore of Destiny I highly recommend checking out a gentleman named ‘My Name is Byf’ on YouTube as he does an incredible job of deep diving the existing lore, and extrapolating on new lore that is still being released.

We do know some information however, as places like Gamestop and Amazon have revealed, we know that there is a character named Hawthorne, who has survived outside the city and without the Guardians protection for many years. We also know that we are on the hunt for new weapons, and humanities scattered heroes thanks to the flavour text in the Destiny 2 collectors edition.

Here is where the speculation aspect comes in, as everything from this point onward is me spit-balling and sharing my wants over what a new Destiny game should be. On the subject of reuniting humanities scattered heroes, I think this is a nod to all of the characters we hear about in the lore. Characters like Efrideet, Tolan, Osiris, Eris Morn, The Awoken Queen Mara Sov and maybe even the Nine. Finding characters like these could be the single player campaign not only gives you a solid foundation to build your story upon, but a great way to include the lore directly into the story, and make many of their player base happy with the lore integration. The fact that Destiny’s lore was on a website and not in the game rubbed many the wrong way, as it is fun to read about what the hell is going on.

Destiny 2 New heroes

Putting aside the trailer though, what really does Destiny 2 need to accomplish, to not only fix the mistakes made on the first game, but to set themselves up for success over this games, presumably, three-year life cycle. It’s first major hurdle is Bungie’s continued adamant stance that it is “like an MMO”. This continued perception not only makes their positives seem muted; such as great gun play, which is a strength of this franchise, gets relegated to a lesser position in the conversation because the empty world, poor story telling and generally un-fulfilling loot grind overshadow it; and its negatives, as previously mentioned, get thrust into the limelight for everyone to criticize. Destiny 2 should be looked at as a Drop-in/Drop-out co-op action adventure game that happens to have hub stations to meet up with more people than you can fit in a team.

The other integral thing Bungie needs to get right is their story. Let’s be blunt here, they fucked up. Their original story was good or bad, no one outside their team knows, and they decided to change it last-minute into some sort of disjointed Frankenstein narrative. It was like Zack Snyder was cutting this game together. Visually looked great, but you could barely connect two plot points together without spending twenty minutes looking through grimoire cards to figure out what was going on. If Destiny 2 is going to continue to earn any good will back, some earned via the Taken King and Rise of Iron, then their story has to be on point. In my mind a 40-60 hour story arc, as a single player campaign, is the time-frame to try to hit. This gives your casual players a good amount of content to go through and experience and allows your hardcore grinders a solid experience they will still rush through but, hopefully, keeps them engaged longer in strikes, dailies and the like on top of their PvP and Raid schedules.

Lastly, something I would personally like to see is the advancement of gun and armour. The infusion system introduced in the original Destiny was a really great step in the right direction, but I personally would like to see more done with this aspect. I look at games like Mass Effect Andromeda, and how as you gain levels you gain access to build/research second, third, etc tier weapons which make them slightly better. If you coupled this type of mechanic with Destiny’s weapon/armour attribute system, not only would this flush out the armoury, it would allow users to really invest in their equipment and gives us, the players, a chance to really look and feel different from the thousand other players.

That said, we have to wait until May 18th to see some actual game play for the game, and that game play will help us really get a grasp on what we should be expecting in Destiny 2.

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Horizon Zero Dawn Review: The Dinobots, a Red Head and fantasy wonder set in a future world

Creeping through the brush, a young woman survey’s her surroundings. Lumbering through the canyon is a creature of gargantuan proportions, its head swaying from side to side as it scanned the area for intruders, heavy weapons twitching and re-aligning to acquire their next target. Scurrying at its feet are a pair of Watchers darting to and fro as they supplement the giant creatures cones of vision and protect its flanks.  A sharp whistle breaks the silence and a Watcher shoots up, immediately on guard and begins to pace cautiously towards the brush the sound came from. As the slender creature steps into the girls hiding spot, a flash of silver lash’s out and pierces the robotic throat, silencing any chance of alarm and putting the first part of her plan into motion. The Thunderjaw circles around a pillar, leaving the second Watcher alone, trailing its alpha predator, and once more a shrill whistle echo’s out to catch the creatures attention. Unlike its partner, this Watcher becomes an ally as its programming is overridden and the pale blue light of compliance wash’s over the machine.

As our heroine lays her trap-wires and resupply’s her quiver, the methodical pounding of the hundred ton machine becomes clearer as it rounds the corner once more, ever vigilant over its territory and both it and the, now turned ally, Watcher process their perspective new threats. The hunter stands, and raises her bow with two arrows knocked, the thrum of two Terrablast arrows send gentle vibrations up her arm. The snap of a bow-string turns into the whine of arrow heads spinning up to blow away armour chunks and the whirl of aggression from the mechanical creatures leaping towards each other. Heavy weapons are rent like so much iron and fall to the floor, forcing the gargantuan beast to move into melee range, its rage focused on the hunter who has damaged it. As she flee’s through her carefully laid gauntlet of traps the Thunderjaw is hammered by explosions and lengths of wire laid to set all who touch it ablaze, all the while being savagely attacked from the rear by our Watcher companion. Arrow after arrow are fired from every angle quickly give way to heavier weapons as supplies run low and a vicious tail swipe makes short work of the diminutive flanker. As she doges charges and blaster fire, our hunter spots the back-mounted weapon she knocked off earlier in the fight and makes a break for it. Ground shaking steps close in on her, and with a final dodge the creature crash’s through a huge stone and couple of tree’s momentarily disorienting it. This window allows for her to not only pick up the weapon, but to turn and unleash the beasts own destructive power upon it, and as it is hammered back farther and farther, metal shrieking and armour plates twisting and rending off under constant barrage, the disheveled monster finally falls, an explosive round hitting it in the side of the head in a glorious display of explosive pyrotechnics. . . . . . .  and that was the first time I fought a Thunderjaw.

If you indulged me my little story I, one appreciate it and two want to use this as the foundation for my review of Horizon Zero Dawn. Made by Guerrilla Games, the developers known for the Killzone series, and published as an exclusive on the PS4, Horizon is quickly becoming another developer who went from ‘good’ to ‘great’ when they took a chance and made something outside of their wheel house. This is a boon as they can be considered in the same pantheon as ID, Naughty Dog and CD Projekt Red for blowing the doors off of what people are expecting in a game. However lets talk about the game instead of the people behind it.

From a cynical point of view, Horizon Zero Dawn does “nothing new”. There are similar quest structures in games like the Witcher 3, crafting systems like in Farcry or Fallout. Bow combat from multiple different games and an open world story that blends Uncharted type acting with the ‘do anything you want at any time’ of today’s open world genre. If you ARE a cynic, then this might be a good place to stop for you as I am going to delve into why Horizon DOES do something new, and that new thing is how it marries all of these idea’s into a beautifully polished package, a feat that none of its comparisons have accomplished yet.

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The first thing anyone notices about Horizon Zero Dawn is its beauty. The game is gorgeous and, in my opinion, doesn’t have an equal on console, as well as rivals some of the best looking games on PC at the moment. Whether its sneaking through the brush, luring your enemies to their death or pounding the trail on the back of a mount racing through a nest of Glinthawks, the game just flows like warm maple syrup. Everything feels like it is in its right place, as I enjoy the mundane aspects like climbing, because it feels good to do, as much as battling a pack of Scrappers or Ravagers. Simple aspects like running both look and feel solid, while leaping off of a boulder or performing a drive-by on the back of a Strider flow from beat to beat with rarely a stutter. Watching the fog in the forest burn away as the sun comes up and you catch glimpses of the wild life scurrying away from you or catch the faint glow of a machine on the distance.

While it has many virtues to its looks, there are some clear downfalls to be seen throughout the entire game. The primary source of these complaints come from the facial animations in the cut scene’s and dialogue interactions. While they still look great, characters mouths don’t quite line up with what they are saying, and their eyes and head start to turn/shift in odd ways as you learn more about a quest or receive thanks from a stranger you have helped. What makes this small gripe so noticeable is the fact that the rest of the experience is handled with such polish that it stands outs so starkly. There are also instances of ‘glitchy dead’ or corpse dancing, though for myself it has only happened once and while you get smooth animations as you one hand vault over a piece of debris, you occasionally see the floating head of a Carja guard as you are approaching. Again this isn’t a major gripe, but it is noticeable so should be mentioned.

Looks aside, I think it is important to move directly into combat, as they have a stronger relationship in this game that most. Out of every aspect in Horizon Zero Dawn that we typically judge a game on, the combat is the crowning achievement you should walk away with. As a third person action game, the shooting mechanics, primarily bow, are second to none. As you upgrade Aloy’s abilities you can gain the ability to knock multiple arrows, to help apply status effects, or the time dilation while jumping to line up that perfect head shot. You can slow time down naturally while aiming without jumping to help you time your shots on charging or flying targets and use the brush to silently kill enemies you lure towards you. Couple this with the ability to set up trip wire traps, tether creatures to the ground and set up individual traps all over to foil enemy flanking attempts and you have a robust combat system to play with over the 30 plus hours you can spend in-game.

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What makes these systems so praise worthy is just HOW fun it is to use them. I spent twenty hours in the starting area, running around killing creatures in different ways. Watching the previously mentioned beauty as Watchers twist as they spin up their leap attack, or dodge and loose a pair of arrows into the side of a charger as it barrels past are simply pure fun. As you progress in creature size and complexity, you upgrade your weapons and get new ones that allow you to change the way you play like using the slingshot for area denial or large group damage. You can hide and corrupt a herd of creatures and watch them battle each other to the death, then stroll in to collect the loot, polishing off any stragglers. Lest we also forget that you can actually override creatures, so gain your self a battle companion which aids you in any nearby combat that happens.

I could extol the virtues of the combat all day, but there are negative aspects. From a general perspective, I have friends who don’t like the fact there is no lock on functionality. As a primarily ranged game I personally think that this would hinder the system, but eye of the beholder and all that as I see the rare time you should be relying on your staff you are already kinda boned. Also in the potential negative camp is how the game deals with large groups of mechanical enemies. It is easy to get overwhelmed if you’re not paying attention which can lead to some frustrating deaths, though again this is more of a personal problem and not one I truly consider a game fault.

One aspect that I do find true fault with is battling against human AI. The issue doesn’t stem from the ability to “whistle-kill” an entire camp from the front door, though that is silly, but in the fact that human on human combat seems so lack luster compared to battling even the most basic of the robotic inhabitants. The human AI in general seems to be incredibly dumb as they will run through open fields to attack me in melee only to turn around and run back to cover, all the while I am shooting them in the face, neck, and chest with arrows. When enemies do get into melee range of you, or used specialized arrows you should look out. I have been taken for seventy-five percent of my health by one specialty arrow, and trying to duke it out in melee with even one brawler can result in huge chunks of your health disappearing much quicker than you would expect.

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Like with all games, there are two other important factors to consider, the audio and the story. While story is important and I will get to that at the end, I feel that the audio in Horizon Zero Dawn really stands a cut above. Whether you are running in the open planes, your feet thudding against the hard packed dirt, or the hard jingle of Oseram Arrow Breaker Heavy chain mail and plate as you leap through the forests dodging Ravager fire the sound always plays as a companion to your story and fights. The throaty grumble of a Snapmaw you may not have seen in the water beneath you saves you from an untimely death, while the whir of a corrupter allows you to dodge attacks from behind as you fight it’s companions. Combat aside, the musical scores that come filter in from the villages and towns brings a haunting serenity to your travels, sometimes hearing nothing but your own labored breathing from a long run, other times being engulfed in the chants of a congregation as they pray to their god. And sometimes as you check your phone for Facebook or Twitter, because we all do it, your head starts to bop as you are entertained by a nightly band that has just started its set from the local inn.

The meat and potatoes though is the story. While I know what happens, I have not personally finished the story on my play through, as I am going for the platinum trophy. That said, I will not be spoiling the story as the game is still relatively new. What I will say about Aloy, and her journey is that it is both incredible and subdued. We play as a young woman, who is strong, resourceful, witty, empathetic and funny, YET it doesn’t feel like someone is blatantly saying “Hey your playing as a girl”. This point may seem odd, but its hard to ignore in todays games media, or any genre culture media, the push for diversity in both character lead and stories told for. Much like The Last of Us dlc Left Behind is one great example of how diversity and progressive story telling can be done, and the way Aloy unfolds as a character keeps you engaged with her and her story and her story is an interesting one. The trailers say as much but you are an outcast, raised by a fellow outcast Rost, who teaches you the way of your people, and your adventures stem from those teaching and the questions you have from the time you were a small child.

I also found myself really engaged with side characters you meet, some near the beginning of the game, others near the end, which again I won’t spoil.  I engage and learn to love them because of how the developers tackle the issue of race, religion, sex and status by not really addressing them. Aloy is part of a tribe that has matriarchs, yet there is no hate or vitriol to be had from that scenario. Other tribes take societal, religious and physical appearances from all over the map.  I have seen Celtic, Norse, Native American, Aztec, Japanese, Zulu, Arabic, and Mongolian influences from the real world, with Dwarven and Minotaur traits pulled from the fantasy world. We cannot forget the druidic and shamanistic natures which many cultures have shared. This world feels like it has been lived in for a thousand years, and that has given us a rich pool to wade into and experience.

Horizion Zero Dawn Climb

A small but important note is all of the images you see here, are taken on the regular PS4, as I spent a good five or six straight hours just finding great shots.I truly fell in love with this game, something I have not done in a long time and I think this last shot above is a perfect summation of why. In Horizon Zero Dawn you are a tiny vessel in a world of metal wonder and whether its delving into its valleys, or climbing to its peaks, the Horizion is really the limit.

As with all of my reviews (going forward) I am using a -10 to 0 score where a -10 is utter garbage and a 0 is as close to perfect as you can get.

Final Score -0.5

The Forge: Looking at Ubisoft Club and how cosmetic rewards should be part of the rewards for trophies/achievements

There has been suggestion, ever since their introduction, that trophies and achievements should add some sort of value to the games they are attached to. Idea’s like each platinum or one thousand gamer score of a game should garner you a few dollars in store credit. Others have been looking for something a bit less monetary, seeking stuff like themes, costumes and other in-game goods.

There have been many games that do this in some fashion, such as Dragons Crown and its artwork after completing levels and quests, Halo and Gears of War giving you avatar helmets, shirts and other accessories as well as many games now a days giving you pre-order skins, weapons or themes for your console. Before we jump into, what I consider to be, the positive aspects of Ubisoft Club lets take a moment to reflect on how Uplay was the first incarnation of their system and how god awful it was.

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Uplay, Ubisofts attempt at DRM, launched way back in July of 2012. While initially it was being touted as a distribution service, similar to Steam or EA’s Origin but it was quickly found out that Uplay was actually Usucks. As a DRM service it quickly became clear that Ubisoft were more focused on trying to control the experience as well as compete with the previously mentioned services as well and just as quickly as the DRM aspect was found out its user base found the service to be incredibly poor.

Not all was lost however, as Uplay introduced, and ultimately became the system I want to talk about here today which is Ubisoft Club. To give a bit of context, Ubisofts Club program which tracks, if you are signed up, your games progress across multiple platforms. As you get trophies or achievements within the game or complete in-game quests or challenges. What does this do for you? Well it gives you an app currency call units, which allows you to purchase in game items. Examples are things like gun skins for Rainbow Six Siege or character costumes in South Park: The Stick of Truth.  Like stated above, there has always been a drive to see our trophies or achievements reward the player in some stance, and while it would be nice to see a monetary value I highly doubt that will ever happen.  What I can see becoming the norm across all gaming platforms is something like Ubisoft Club, let me explain why.

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First off, lets talk about the potential negative aspects for a system like this being implemented across all platforms. The immediate though it sectioning off content from the main game to use for this system, much like some believe DLC content is being used. To be fair we have seen companies play on both sides of this fence and some of the less scrupulous one would opt to take the easy way out. Another aspect of this is watered down versions character creators or customization within the game as the developers would want you to play through as much of your game to unlock these options.

The other potentially negative aspect of this system is the cross-pollination rewards from the same developer. Ubisoft already does this as when you are going through one game, such as The Division, you see rewards for being a part of the alpha or beta for that game as well as having a copy registered of another game, such as Rainbow Six Siege in this example. Some may consider this to be a moot point, as you could make the argument for, “If I don’t want the game, I won’t buy it” and that argument is valid. However I do have the worry that this point couple’s in with my first point on sectioning off the best content to these essential pay walls.

Considering all of the negative aspects though, I personally think there is potential for this type of service/system to be a net positive overall. Obviously, if you don’t care about the cross promotional items then not having them will be a moot point, which goes double for customization options in general if that is not an important feature to you. What I think could be the driving force behind this however is the ability for each dev to give more to the players without really raising the costs of their development.

There is obviously the initial investment of setting up this Club type system but once that is in place on one game, you can start to streamline the process across all your other titles. Giving your players who beat the single player campaign of their game a new character skin or weapon skin is just a small piece of the picture. You could include themes or wallpapers. If you want to move away from Collectors editions you could include the soundtrack once you have platinum/1000 gamer score a game, or completed it on the hardest difficulty.

Coupling the single player aspects into multiplayer could also bring about significant longevity to a game as a new skin or taunt animation from single player could have some of us going back in to grind/work for it while multiplayer-centric unlocks and items could not only be tied to, once again, trophies or achievements but to quests or missions you carry out in the game. A perfect recent example of this is For Honor, which has a mission system in its game already, and once that could be easily modified or copied over to Ubisoft Club’s platform to keep people invested in said game much longer. Rainbow Six Siege already has this function enabled, and gives you in-game currency and experiences points.

While I am not sure if this will ever happen, to me it seems like a smart move as a publisher to start looking into something like this because at the end of the day, don’t you want a higher retention rate on your games? Maybe the gamification of games can help with that.

For Honor review: Scream, Aim, and toss your enemies off a cliff! (Final review)

Ubisoft Montreal might have had a magic mirror into my heart when they started thinking up this game. As a long time proponent of action adventure games which focus on combat For Honor is a seemingly perfect package of visceral combat, fun customization and easy to learn but hard to master combat system.

For honor is a third person action fighting game which dives deeper into the traditional heavy and light attacks normally associated with action fighting games. Make no mistake, you are still aiming to crush your opponent’s head or lop off a limb, but the combat system has its feet firmly planted in the tactical nature that most associate with higher level traditional fighting games such as Street Fighter or Mortal Kombat. In For Honor, you have three stances which correlate not only to how you attack, but also how you block. So if you are situated to swing on your left side, any attack’s coming from that side, your opponents right, would be auto blocked unless you are in mid swing or other more advanced mechanics like parry’s, guard breaks and unblockable attacks.

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What is fantastic about each faction, such as the Knights shown above, is that every character has the same base mechanics; light attack, heavy attack, block, parry and combo chains to do continuous damage yet each character plays in its own unique way. Even within the loosely based class system of Assassin, Heavy, Vanguard and Hybrid those characters have a different skill set you need to master to truly blossom in battle.

Mastering the characters you think are interesting or cool is both the focus and the detriment to the game though. If you focus merely on one character you start to fully realize their potential but then struggle to identify the nuances of others. I personally Play the Conqueror and routinely find myself struggling against the faster more agile assassins of each faction. If you are looking to hone your skills, the practice mode has a couple of bot’s which help you anticipate certain characters move sets as you increase the difficulty.

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There are six games modes you can pick from, five of them being multiplayer modes like Dominion, 1v1 duels and 2v2-4v4 elimination match’s while the sixth mode type is the single player. The single player runs you through six levels for each faction and in my experience so far, just finishing the knight campaign, it is a fun way to learn each of the characters at a basic level while helping newer players come to gripes how each character attacks and defends. The slightly annoying aspect is that if you already did the practice mode, which grants you some in-game currency called steel, then jump into the single player campaign, you will get these same tutorial prompts over the course of the campaign. Minor gripe, but I didn’t see a place in options to turn that off.

The real meat of this game however is in its multiplayer mode. I personally prefer Dominion as I am still trying to ‘git gud’ in duels but each mode brings you as a fighter into a well designed and beautiful looking world in which you can unleash your rage against your enemy, or just troll them and throw them off the side of a cliff, which is great when you do it to someone but incredibly rage inducing when it happens to you. One thing I will mention if you are duo queuing in duels is be honorable, fight your fight and if you win wait for the other fight to finish before jumping into the combat, if your teammate lost, and you should see many players do the same in return. The “honor of the duel” seems to be pretty well-respected in these match’s but every once in a while you come across a pair of shitheads who bring shame to their family.

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Not all is mead and cherry blossoms however, Ubisoft decided to run it’s multiplayer match’s off of a peer-to-peer system which, as many are painfully aware of, can cause issues with lag if you are fighting against people with poor connection or on the other side of the planet. Like many PtP connection they try to match you with users close to you so your connection is good, but you don’t always find those games, and on more than one occasion I am battling against people/ in Asia, Germany and Spain and the game starts to act a bit wonky. This has also caused issues with connecting to games in general as there are many times I have sat in a search lobby for two to three minutes only to be timed out. *After playing for a couple of weeks now, the peer-to-peer connection is still an issue that players have to deal with and it hurts the flow and pacing of most fights. Getting random disconnects, or taking five minutes to load into a match can really put a damper on your spirit to play.

Another aspect which seems a bit lack luster is their currency system, or I should say their acquisition of said currency. Like I mentioned above the practice mode gives you two thousand steel, while advanced practice mode gives you an additional fifteen hundred. However after that your steel generation is tied to your performance in combat and completing daily missions. All give you exp and steel but the quantity varies and if you are still learning the game, there are some missions that will be very difficult to complete.

Finishing up the review

After putting in another twenty or thirty hours, I can say my opinion of For Honor has shifted slightly. While still an overall positive review of this game, I think Ubisoft has, once again, harmed their own property with poor choice and sloppy implementation. Lets break down the last pieces of this review with the completion of the campaign and delving into some higher tier player vs player combat.

On the side of the story, For Honor delivers a pretty enjoyable single player experience. Each chunk, one for each faction is split into six missions. These missions are there to not only teach you about the various classes, as stated above, but also to break up the potential monotony of playing the same class. I played the game co-op on the realistic setting which increased the games difficulty up a bit for most of the game, but had random huge difficulty spikes, usually when it came to a boss. The end boss battle against Apolyon for example is utterly brutal, and made even more difficult with the addition of more enemy npc’s due to the co-op mode. On any other difficulty you get a well paced, albeit simple, story that is pretty enjoyable to play.

While I have enjoyed my time playing For Honor the bulk of its game play, the multiplayer, really started to show its short sighted nature over the last week or so. In the 1v1 and 2v2 dueling modes, the game is at its absolute best as you are competing straight up with another person’s skill, an aspect of the game I think the developers really nailed home. However once you start getting into the 4v4 game modes; elimination, dominion and skirmish, break down both the games skill and tactical nature of game play. Feats allow the player to alter their character in ways that are hard to predict, so in one fight you could hit harder, regenerate off of killing minions while in the next game you could face off against someone who has two ranged attacks which do huge damage to you. While I get the added flavour and surprise factor of these feats, it does detract from the actual fighting mechanics in For Honor.

Speaking of fighting mechanics, it seems once you get into a 4v4 game type, the concept of one on one fights, challenging capture points and tactical thinking while playing goes right out the window. No one fights in any meaningful fashion as it boils down to ganging up on lone targets, and running away from any fight that isn’t two to one in your favour. This really cuts down on the finesse of For Honor’s combat system and frankly segments the community a bit when it comes to the game overall. You have those who are looking for the skill based combat of duels and 2v2, and in the opposite camp you have the murderfest of the 4v4 game types.

At the end of the day, I still enjoy the game, as I have said a few times now. I find the combat enjoyable and the experience with friends to be an extra entertaining time as we yell and curse about being thrown into pits, hit by friendly teammates bleed damage and win that sweet 2v1 battle by the skin of our teeth. As with all of my reviews (going forward) I am using a -10 to 0 score where a -10 is utter garbage and a 0 is as close to perfect as you can get.

Final Score -2.5 

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Nintendo Switch Conference: High expectations and low returns

Like many of us I went into the Nintendo Switch presentation with high hopes, one could say too high. News leaks and tidbits of info got me to believe in the hype and raised my expectations of what was to come. Sadly though I broke the cardinal rule when it comes to conferences/game & console releases and allowed the hype to get out of hand and thus brings me, and seemingly many others, into the camp of confusion and disappointment.

The beginning of the conference started off well, as we got the price point of 299.99 American and a release date of March 3rd with the added bonus of a simultaneous launch in most major markets. Add this to the removal of region lock and fact that you can link up to eight Switch’s together to play in the same game and the console had a lot of promise to be a fun machine to bring around with you, but then we get into the oddball announcements. 

Nintendo is jumping into the ‘paid online service’ game along with Microsoft and Sony, but not until the fall as they have nothing currently ready to pay for. To compound this it was announced that subscribers to the service would receive one Nintendo or Super Nintendo game each month, however it was only for the month. While odd, this does run similarly to Microsoft’s games with gold program so maybe this won’t be as big of an issue as I think it is.   There is not much information on how this is all working, so like the free game a month, this may not be as big of an issue once more information is released. The one aspect of the Switch which has everyone scratching their head is Nintendo’s decision to make their voice coms system only usable through other media devices such as phones and, I assume, tablets. It boggles the mind on how this was the best solution in their mind especially when you consider that each game will decide if they want to include it or not.

Talking a bit more about the system brought to light some fears that were already in the community, the battery life, some basic quality of life upgrades in a capture/share button and everyone’s favourite feature; rumble. The battery life is touted as being two and a half hours to six hours which will likely be closer in reality to the lower end of the battery life. Battery life is always a tricky subject to tackle as people want to be optimistic about how long their charge will last, and much like phones the more you use your system the less the charge retains. It will likely be two and a half to three hours for most ‘big games’ and four to five hours for smaller or less intensive experiences while retaining the full six when using YouTube or other low end functions. As Nintendo showed off the controller, it was easy to see that it was not make for the average north american/European hand as they are incredibly small. A small saving grace is that the strap you attach to the Joy Con gives the entire controller a bit more girth.

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While we hummed and hawed over the console itself, Nintendo started talking about their games. Some part of the launch day line up, others within the launch window and finally some, which for the non-Japanese reading audience, were oddities with no date, or name, really set.  Eurogamer has a list of all games apparently announced for the Switch at some point and broke them down into their respective launch windows.

The launch day titles for the Nintendo’s new console seem to run the gambit of a traditional launch. You have the heavy hitter title in Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, followed up with games like Just Dance 2017 for the family entertainment and Skylanders Imanginators as a title for the younger audience. Add in a dash of nostalgia with a new look in Super Bomberman R and you have a moderate line up to keep most type of players engaged. The last launch title is 1,2 Switch, a new party style game which uses the Joy Con to perform activities such as milking a cow, seeing who has the quickest draw ala the wild west gun fights as well as a host of other face to face variations of games. This eschews the traditional screen experience to, as Nintendo is know for, try and bring a unique experience to the user(s) while they play. Heavily mocked name aside, I personally think there are some interesting applications and mini games to be found here, even if one of them is milking a cow.

We then get into the post release first party games, which range from a month or two after launch all the way to the the holiday season we get to some meaty games. Right away Mario kart 8 sticks out for two opposite but equally important reasons. On the one hand, having a kart game near the launch of the Switch is very important and gives the audience one of Nintendo’s most family friend titles. On the opposite side of that coin however is the fact this Mario kart is a ‘game of the year’ edition, bundling all the existing dlc into one disc, with a new piece of dlc in a few characters maps and battlemode changes. The lack of a new game worries some as it seems like the Switch has been relegated to ports of games on the Wii-U. The summer brings us Splatoon 2 which again seems to suffer the same ‘port +’ issues as Mario Kart, and then potentially nothing. Every other first party title is late 2017 or TBC, which does not instill confidence which is infuriating as games like Fire Emblem Warriors, Super Mario Odyssey and the rumored Pokémon Stars are heavy hitters needed. 

Third party games, the life blood that Nintendo needs, makes a moderately strong showing with fifteen games announced for 2017. We however immediately go back to the concerns discussed in the first party section. Seven of these titles are ports and while that is less than half, it is by the narrowest of margins.  Couple that with the other eight games do not scream triple a title and no real release date talked about, fans can’t help but feel a bit jilted, even if they are looking forward to said titles. For my own personal taste the other games by third parties with a TBC as the release date are my most anticipated as games like Dragon Quest X and XI, Seasons of Heaven, Shin Megami Tensei, and the ridiculously named Project Octopath Traveller. The wait for these however is one, on a personal level, of the biggest frustrations about the Nintendo Switch.

Much like movies, no sane person goes into a hobby or entertainment experience and hopes it fails. With that said I find that for every step forward made at this conference was coupled by two steps back with poorly defined objectives and an underwhelming plan for the year. I want Nintendo to be a juggernaut and bring their experiences to the masses, but as of this moment we are seeing a similar message as the Wii-U and that worries me as a fan of the company and a fan of their properties 

Games of the year: Why have only one!

Christmas has passed,  and I am looking at the pile of games beside me still humming and hawing over what have been my biggest and brightest for the end of the year. So many games have come out that I have enjoyed it is hard narrowing it down to a single choice, so I thought it would be enjoyable to pick a list of five games which have blown me away with story telling and game play. Please forgive my shitty logo as I suck at such things. As with any game of the year list, these are the games that stuck out to me, probably not objectively the best.

doom

I would be remiss if I didn’t start this list off with Doom. When I heard a new Doom was in the works, this is what I imagined it to be, and by god they delivered. The previous editions of  Doom left a bad taste in my mouth, as I have always thought the *straight action* aspect of the early era Doom games was the correct path for this franchise, and spinning into a more horror-survival style game wasn’t really my speed. Cut to 2016 and id software returns us to a deluge of thundering metal and the satisfying symphonic whine of the chain gun spinning up as you punch, kick and blow your way through Hell.

What enthralled me with Doom is its old school style but new school aesthetics. It’s the combination of fast and frantic gun-play and the near need for constant changing of play style which really makes this game stand out as a single player experience. You, as the Doom Marine, answer any and all questions with a visceral punch and a femur shattering kick, and while that may seem cheesy/childish to say out loud but once you step into those heavy boots it all feels right.

ratchet-and-clank

If Ratchet & Clank isn’t on your list of games of the year, I don’t really know what to say to you. Bringing back one of, if not the, best platformer heroes on the Playstation console. Ratchet & Clank is a near master piece for this genre in my opinion as it checks off pretty much every box this series has been known for. Great third person shooter mechanics? check; Over the top ridiculous weapons? Double check; Entertaining story? check-squared; Annoying front facing run missions as clank which piss you off because you didn’t time your jump correctly? Still there *shakes fist*.

Joking aside, this game brings the nostalgia of this series back for us old timers, and gives the new generation of players to the Groovitron, the Sheepinator and the ever chipper Mr. Zurkon. If you have not picked this game up yet I implore you to spend a few dollars, as it’s probably cheaper now than it was at launch, which was still only $40 at launch. You will have a fun, family friendly game that you, your significant other and/or your kids can get behind for a damn good time.

grand-kingdom

Into RPG’s? Like multi-lane combat systems? Hankering to have a Dragon Mage leap into the air and death laser as your warrior uses his area defence to block for your entire party?! Then you are in luck because Grand Kingdom should quench your RPG tactic’s thirst. I have put in a ton of time into this game, whether it’s through the five different stories or battling against other players in their online war system, and each fight brings its own unique challenges as you play a loose game of paper-rock-scissors with your four man, or woman, party as you battle your way through enemy armies and monsters.

I think what interested me most about this game was its blend of art direction, a combat system that allows you to customize your party to your play style and a fairly lightweight but fun inventory management that again, lends itself towards a party & play style that works for you. If you are looking for a fun and engaging tactical RPG, then look at Grand Kingdom, as you can also get it on PSVita and you should be buying more games on Vita.

overwatch

Not surprising and assuredly on many people’s list this year is Overwatch. What is there really to say about this game other than it is a masterclass in the shooter genre. Blizzard blows the doors off of pretty much every other shooter out this year with not only the quality of its shooter mechanics, but also it introduced us to many loved characters, and adult themed tumblr blogs of those characters, to which we rally behind.

Whether its playing late night with a friend from Toronto as our Zarya (me)/Zenyatta (him) duo crushing noobs or sitting beside a buddy as we Mercy (again me) and Soldier our way through the upper tiers of gold, Overwatch has given me countless hours of enjoyment, frustration and *fuck yeah* moments both as a solo player and in groups. It continues to add characters, events and skins to keep players interested and will be a staple in my system for many months to come.

i-am-setsuna

As a huge fan of the old school RPG’s from early Nintendo and Playstation years, especially Chrono Trigger, I am Setsuna was an INSTANT buy for me. It has been a long time since I have gotten to sink my teeth into this style of game, and while Grand Kingdom does sait my hunger slightly for JRPG’s, I am Setsuna is really the *full meal experience* that I was looking for. Much like the Witcher 3 from last year this game, for me, stands out amongst the crowd for its story and overall theme, which again harks back to one of my favourite games Chrono Trigger.

I don’t know if I have played a game like this in the past couple years, as it blends a fantastic art style along with a somber and almost depressing tone to tell a great story. On top of that is a deep and beastly magic system to blow your way through enemy’s as you escort Setsuna to the end of her line.

stardew_valley

Only last on this list because it is the latest I have picked up is Stardew Valley. This game has been out for a while on PC, but I picked it up for PS4 and holy cow, what a fantastic game. A buddy of mine turned me onto it as I had forgotten about it, and I cannot thank him enough for it. Who doesn’t want a game to relax with a bit of farming, some potential romance and battling slimes in a mine as you gather ore.

This game is incredibly relaxed, and in a time when we are battling through world war 1, floating through space fighting robots and still playing Overwatch, it is fantastic to have a light weight RPG farming simulator which lets just do your thing. Chopping wood, making iron bars, and farming your way to a fortune is just too damn good. Get this game people.

Obviously these are my personal games of the year as they were the highlights of my year. I didn’t play everything and while other games did better in sales, or had higher review scores, these six games gave me the most enjoyment of the year. I do want to give honorable mention to Ubisoft’s The Division. While it had its issues in the beginning, I found myself drawn back into the game once the fixes started coming in. All in all a great year of games and I cannot wait for 2017’s list to kick off.

Year in Review: Gaming level ups, failed objectives and the age old promise of great gameplay.

Like many who write, either full-time for work or just to enjoy the act of putting thought to page, I too have a year in review type article to add to the internet’s list. It is currently 4am and I have a literal two liter mug of coffee so let’s get this started.

The beginning of the year, for the non-game news was a mixed bag. EA released Origin Access in January, and while I don’t partake, it looks like a decent system for Microsoft users to toy around with. Blizzard Entertainment celebrated its 25th anniversary in February as well as the Pokemon franchise turning twenty. On a sad note, GameTrailers had to shut its digital doors and the internet mourned for a moment, then went back to making memes.

As we head into spring, another unfortunate closer in the way of Evolution studios in March, though in April the majority of their employee’s were taken in by Codemasters. The Resident Evil franchise had its 20th anniversary, Sega acquired Atlas and Lionhead studio’s was closed by Microsoft. In weird news Gamestop announced its new publishing arm called Game Trust and NIS America announced it cut ties with Atlas due to the Sega acquisition. The first casualty in the ‘toys to life’ genre was had when Disney Interactive studio’s closed Avalanche Software as they decided that self publication was not in their best interests. On a more positive note, juggernaut gaming new site IGN purchased a ton of GameTrailer’s assets from Defy Media. Oh we cannot forget that Yahoo’s games was shut down by Yahoo. . . . *sarcasm*

Rolling into the summer months, things start to heat up with the Vivendi hostile take over of Gameloft. June saw the rise of the Electronic Entertainment Expo or E3 which had both Microsoft and Sony give incredible conferences. Electronic Arts also had their first ‘fan-event’, EA Play,  outside of E3 with a moderate amount of success. Quietly, yet somehow equally as raucous Sonic the Hedgehog celebrated his 25th anniversary and if you haven’t seen their live show clips on YouTube, please do yourself a favour and watch that madness. On some bitter-sweet news Adam Boyes, VP of Third Party Relations,  left his position at Sony to flex his creative muscles over at Iron Galaxy an indie dev breaking onto the scene. At the end of the summer we had Gamescom in Germany and I imagine that was packed to the gills as usual. We also had an interesting turn from Nordic Games, who changed their name to THQ Nordic. Unsure if this was to help with brand recognition, as they bought most of the ip’s THQ had, or they are tempting fate by putting THQ in their name.

The fall, and leading into the winter gave us some interesting spikes in non-game specific news. Microsoft Studios announced their ‘Xbox Play Anywhere’ program to allow cross-play between Xbox One and Windows 10. Blizzard announced that they would be phasing out their online battle.net, in name only, to a more generic ‘Blizzard tech’. This allows for less confusion on which account name you need, and I imagine makes their back-end management significantly easier. We also had two pretty big shows to close out the year in The Game Awards, hosted by Geoff Keighley and PSX, a fan focused Playstation event. The Game Awards, in my opinion, were very lack luster, as most of the awards were given off camera and the categories were not given the explanation and gravity you would want or expect. Also the product placement was pretty terrible. Skip forward a week and you have Sony’s PSX event which rocked the house. Like any good fan focused event, Playstation got the crowd fired up with the Crash Bandicoot triglogy look, Patapon/Loco Roco/Parappa the Rappa remasters and a Wipeout HD collection for the PS4.

all-about-the-games

Talking about the year we obviously cannot forget the actual games. Above and beyond the games however there were also six new pieces of hardware released, which is insane. March and April saw the release of PC gaming’s VR gladiators; the HTC Vive and the Oculus Rift, then piling all into the end of the year we have the Xbox One S in August, the PS4 slim in September, the Playstation VR in October and finally just released in November is the PS4 Pro. Hardware aside, we also got a metric ton of games to sink our teeth into. Some great, some terrible, and others leaving an odd taste in our mouth.

January kicks us off with a cluster of gems that need to be played. If you own a Vita, and you should, pick up Volume as it was released near the beginning of the month. A fun tactical stealth game which hooks you almost instantly. Another pair of fantastic games that were criminally overlooked was That Dragon Cancer, a heart crushing story about a boy with cancer and The Banner Saga, an intense turn based strategy RPG harking back to the old days with beautiful artwork servicing your journey. While I have not played it yet, Oxenfree was another game that became a critical darling yet did not see the love it seemingly deserved. If you are a fan of the Soul’s style of tension and overbearing nature I should not have to say much for Darkest Dungeon a game that lends credence to the motto “stare into the abyss long enough and the abyss stares back”. Nintendo had a strong month with Minecraft Story Episode 1, Mario & Luigi Paper Jam and Final Fantasy Explorers. Sony also had a strong finish to the month with The Witness, a complex puzzle game as well as Dragon Quest Builders a game of Dragon Quest meets Minecraft.

February and March had a bevy of games for us to purchase, and hear our wallets weep due to their emptiness. In no particular order, the first half of the month gave us, Firewatch, Digimon Story: Cyber Sleuth, Great Detective Pikachu, an expansion to Dying Light called ‘The Following’, Lovers in a Dangerous Space time and a remaster of the fantastic tactial RPG Valkyria Chronicles. The back half of February gave us Rocket League on Xbox, a fantastic RPG in I am Setsuna, Fire Emblem Fates, Stardew Valley; which is a must play and Planets vs Zombies Garden Warfare 2 which was surprisingly fun. March brings us gems such as Broforce to PS4, Gears of War: Ultimate edition on Xbox One and the Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess HD on WiiU. We also got the punishing side scroller Salt and Sanctuary for the Bloodborne fans, an episodic action adventure stealth game in République. As the month closes out, we get the start of season three for Killer Instinct, Hyper Light Drifter and a fantastic but brutally underrated game known as Sleeping Dogs Definitive edition.

April thru June at first glance seems like a dry portion of the year, I however think there were a ton of great games to be played through these months, not to mention your backlog of games that you keep meaning to get to. We get games like the punishing game Enter the Gungeon, the time warping Quantum Break and everyone’s favourite way to hate themselves; Dark Souls III. We cannot forget the incredibly well done Ratchet and Clank game, a new entry to the franchise after so long, as well as the snarky yet charming Stories: Paths of Destiny, and before you say it I do agree it had a whackadoodle name, but it is pretty damn fun. The 3DS rocketed back into many RPG fan’s lives with Bravely Second: End Layer, and Vita Owners got another great reason to dust off their system with the release of Axion Verge. If you are into Metroidvania games this is a must pick up on either Vita or PS4, but really just get it for Vita and support the cause. A follow-up to a great game on PC, Banner Saga 2 got released near the end of April though we also saw the release of the not so hot Star Fox game for the WiiU, so much potential there.Alienation fed our ‘fast paced Diablo but in space with lasers’ fix as we fought corrupted humans, bipedal alien soldiers and Goliath’s that could crush you in a single blow.

Battleborn a game that should have come out six months earlier releases at the beginning of March, and consequently gets demolished by Overwatch which came out near the end of the month. We also saw the rise of hell and the subsiquent asskicking it received in the fantastic Doom game from id software. Uncharted 4 was also released and much like the previous titles, it was another smash hit. On the disappointing side we had Home Front: Revolution which failed to capture its previous games glory as well as TMNT Mutants in Manhatten, a game which seems like it would be hard to bungle, but ended up being a spastic mess. We can swing back to positivity though with Total War: Warhammer, a true blue representation of Games Workshop’s table top battle game as well as Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness. A cluster of smaller games also came out throughout this block of the year which I found very entertaining. Grand Kingdom, a three lane tactical RPG, stole many nights and weekends from me while Hearts of Iron IV consumed a few friends for a full month and the always beautiful Odin sphere Liefthrasir had Atlas back in the spotlight.

July through September, to me, were the months of the indie title. I played more small/budget games over these three months than I have in the last couple years. Headlander, Brutal, Abzu, Bound and Song of the Deep gave me the joy of a simple yet challenging game, much like the games of our youth (if your over 30) while titles like I am Setsuna tugged at the emotional heartstrings and Hyper Light Drifter gave Playstation and Xbox owners a sample of what Zelda could be like on their system, the real winner is Pokemon Go. This game nuked everything else around it from orbit and dominated the majority of July.We also saw the release of Telltales new Batman series which got rave reviews and from what I hear, the entire first season is a great buy. Dues Ex Go also came out and brought a new spin to a franchise that it needed as well as got us up to Tomb Raider Go! We cannot talk about heavy hitters without mentioning the new World of Warcraft expansion as it did insane numbers. We were also treated to the Bioshock Collection on PS4/Xbox One as well as the Dead Rising collection. While not an incredibly notable game, I would personally be remiss to leave out Warhammer 40k Eternal crusade from my list as while my PC is blown out, and I write this on a tablet, I am a huge Warhammer 40k fan and want to start playing this. I also have to shout out Spacehulk: Deathwing, out in December, another 40k game that allows you to cleanse giant spaceships full of aliens with both blade and bullet.We cannot talk about all of these games, plus those not mentioned, without pausing to give light to No Man’s Sky. A mountain of promises and hype which crumbled under its own weight. I personally had a pretty good time playing the game, as I had not expected ‘the world’, to turn a phrase, from this game. It’s current updates seem to be moving in the right direction in terms of features promised, but we will have to see if people are still interested in trying to sail to the center of the universe.

At last we come to October to December. Many games pushed into the new year, many games announced but no release dates, and many still incredibly vague on details with a seemingly close release. Looking into these gets me excited, my wallet terrified and my electric company happy with the power usage. Mafia III is the first big title I looked at, and I have to say minor bugs aside I had a good time with this game. It falls into a similar trap many Ubisoft games do; which is the collectible grind turns into a slog, that turns into a “why am I doing this again” type of mentality. Gears of War 4 was released to a moderately positive review/reception while Rise of the Tomb Raider: 20th year anniversary got stellar praise. As the VR train for Sony was officially out we got a lot of experiences like the Batman VR which ran the gambit of responses. Some, like Batman VR, were received well, while others fell flat or didn’t fulfill their ambitious goals. I do not have a virtual reality headset, so I don’t believe my opinion on these games is very valid. We have four titans battling it out as we continue through October and head into November. Battlefield 1, Titanfall 2 and Call of Duty Infinite Warfare all shoot it out, while Civilization VI consumes you one turn at a time. Midway through November we have Dishonored 2 and Watchdogs 2, both games didn’t interest me too much personally and if you look at their sales numbers, that sentiment was echoed across the player base. We obviously cannot forget the juggernaut that Nintendo have in their back pocket with the 3DS’s Pokemon Sun & Moon, while a personal favourite of mine got remastered. . . well Warmastered. Darksiders Warmastered edition is another fantastic remaster to own and beat back daemons and angels. I have to say that December has been a slow month for me, lack of money to purchase games means I have been working on my backlog and sinking time into the PS4 version of Stardew Valley (which you should get if you don’t have it). That said, can you beleive the mostly positive attention that both Final Fantasy XV and Last Guardian are getting! Who would have thought those troubled developments would turn out the games they did.  I have heard however a lot of the games being released this month have been doing well so that is positive news heading into the holidays.

It is obvious we didn’t cover all the games released this year, as that would be insane and require a team of people. I do think however the ones I have covered, both games and game news are some of the highlights of this year. This also doesn’t cover the media aspect of gaming, such as the gentlemen from Kinda Funny or listening to the fantastic podcasts from IGN. Listening to Giantbomb Podcasts while planting  beans in Stardew Valley or watching the Knerds of the Round table podcast on YouTube while researching DPS builds for the Division Darkzone. Let us not forget reading Superman American Alien by Max Landis while listening to Collider Heroes dish on all the Comicbook related movies and TV.

This year has been a bounty of games, experiences, people and shows. I look forward to another 365 days of nerding/geeking out and look forward to consuming as much content as humanly possible.