Logan Review – Regenerating a love for the Berserker in all our hearts (Spoiler)

It is odd for a movie, especially one in the comic book genre, to leave you both fiercely grinning and wiping a tear from your eye. It evoked images of every Berserker rage we should have seen in previous movies past, along with the incredible compassion Wolverine has with younger female characters, a trait we have seen often. With our, seemingly, last snikt to be had, let’s get into a review of Logan.

Wolverine as a character has always been at odds with its movie counterpart. As a PG13 rated series in the X-Men, we have never really seen the animalistic nature of the Weapon X project in full swing until this movie. As a personal fan of the character since my real introduction to him in 1991, I have always wanted to see the rage and sorrow that good writers brought to the character, and while previous movie entries have tried, none have succeeded like Logan.

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The first five minutes of the movie show how broken down and beaten our Old man Logan really is. Relegated to a limo driver to stay alive and support Charles and Caliban as they hide out, he has to do everything possible to protect his livelihood aka the limo. Que the group of scumbags and a bloodbath ensues. Even in the minor rage we see towards the end of the fight, it is ever-present that there is something wrong with our anti-hero. This fight also shows us the brutal nature of the R rating, which pulls no punch’s as men are dismembered and disfigured with absolute authority.

Putting aside the violence for a moment, it has to be said that Hugh Jackman crush’s it in his portrayal of Logan in this movie. Taking bits and pieces from the Old man Logan comic book and mixing it in with ideas of family, self loathing, depression and the faint rays of light known as happiness play themselves out across the world-weary brow of Logan. Throughout this movie there is an underlying pressure which bubbles to the surface that causes not only Wolverine, but Charles, Caliban, Laura, and the villains known as the Reavers to shift violently into this movies R rating. This shift is not only what keeps the movie on its relatively quick pace but also helps you grow with the characters as they struggle with their life choices and battle their own demons. Putting aside the few instances in which the movie slows down, which I will talk about in a bit, the movie flies by for just under two hours and twenty minutes.

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While it is easy to extol virtue onto Hugh Jackman for this, in my opinion, Oscar worthy performance one should not sleep on the rest of the supporting cast. Patrick Stewart as Professor X gives not only the best performance of the character to date, but also manages to make the use of fowl language both funny and meaningful. You never think of that character as one to lower themselves to such a vulgar level, yet the first F’bomb you hear him utter not only makes you laugh, but gives you a moments pause to consider the situation they are in for that relationship, one of father and care taker of a troubled youth turned into one of bitterness, regret and strained loyalty.  His death scene in particular shows the terrible burden he realizes he did but also on how Logan took the burden of that travesty upon himself to spare his mentor the pain and anguish.

While he had a small role, I think it is worth talking about Stephen Merchant as Caliban. He had a small amount of screen time, even less than the villains of the story, but I feel his presence was akin to the ‘voice of reason’ for Logan’s perpetual darkness that he drudged through. This is plays again in the fact that he is ultra sensitive to sunlight, so his light in the darkness role plays twice in a somber yet humorous nature. The motif of shadow and light play in one final time due to a taunt thrown at him by the Reavers leader upon capture, and utters as a final defiance before his sacrifice to try and aid Laura and Logan in any way possible with “Beware the Light”.

Before talking about the incredibly talented actress in Dafne Keen, I want to touch on the villains of the movie. As mentioned before, our bad guys consist of a enhanced para military type unit called the Reavers. These cyborgs don’t sport all the modifications from their comic book representations, but hey we can’t always have a guy with tank treads rolling around now can we. Special mention should be given to Boyd Holbrook however as he walks the difficult line that all villains of this genre have to walk. His character, Donald Pierce, does an excellent job of being menacing, smart, and sophisticated without being cheesy, bland or overbearing. His understated animosity and aggressiveness towards, coupled with his brief star struck nature meeting Logan when looking for X23 is just one example of how a constant pressure applied to a wound, in this case Charles, Logan and Laura on the run, make for a great villainous intent that doesn’t need an overbearing nature we would expect from other comic book movies. He may not be Loki, but Donald Pierce might be one of the best villains in a movie with super powers.

Now to talk about the woman who stands toe to toe with our failing berserker, the incredible Dafne Keen. The short version of her character is she is a clone of Wolverine, made with his DNA in a lab somewhere and as a new version in the weapon X program, x23 to be exact, she was supposed to be a new weapon to be manufactured. For every inch of height disparity between Laura and Logan, Mrs. Keen makes up for in pure savagery when she unleashes her own brand of fury upon her enemies. It would be easy to think that a tiny girl would be dangerous, yet ultimately ineffective against men thrice her stature and estimated skill level, yet nothing could be further from the truth as not only is she a trained killer, but for someone so young she couples her brutal efficiency with her speed, agility and penchant for groin/near groin shots puts her high on the little murder girl spectrum.

For most of the movie X23 says nothing, instead preferring to communicate in pensive or glowering stares to all but the Professor. Her attitude give her a larger than life body in which we see her slip in and out of. On the one hand, the aforementioned murder girl vibe sits comfortably within her character as not only a clone of Logan, but as a defensive mechanism that any kid may try and reenact when treated as poorly as she has been. The other side of that coin falls into her softer side, the child peaking out of the animal that is caged within said child. A perfect example of this is her riding the mechanical horse and as she grows frustrated with the ride ending, and not understanding how to make it work, she resorts to a nature she knows works, violence. Que Logan with a quarter and stern gaze, and we see Laura’s demeanor switch back to that pensive stare to Logan and back again to the child, enjoying a ride on a mechanical horse.

Thankfully James Mangold, the writer and director was not content to make a tiny ball of rage be the only side we see from Dafne Keen’s performance. Once she starts talking, you feel the passion of a character looking for love, being scared, and trying to understand why a man, who feels like her doesn’t love her. If that doesn’t stab you through the heart then you could be a Reaver.

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As both simultaneously wind down the story and ramp up the violence, I think it is apt to actually touch on how violent this movie is. At an R rating, the fowl language is one thing, but rarely have we seen the R rating bring us the level of pin point carnage we see in Logan. The image above is actually one of the more tame images to choose from as we see the skull get pierced, slashed and eventually blown away, not to mention the copious amount of limb rending, flesh tearing and flurry of bladed blows to the face neck and chest of this movies more regenerative characters.

As stated in the first sentence of this review, I was grinning from ear to ear in every major fight, as I found Logan’s use of violence to be so inline with the character and the story that I couldn’t contain my happiness and excitement to see what unique way a man would die next. Morbid as it may sound, the brutality not only shocks you but it deepens the stakes we see as the movie progresses. Whether its Logan struggling against the telepathic outbursts of Charles Xavier, punching his claws into the wall as some sort of makeshift climbing pick only to stare into the eyes of men he killed or the fury and rage of a juiced up Logan in the forest frantically running and murdering yet still looking to protect the children he would as a member of the X-Men.

None of the violence hits quite as hard or bloody as the set pieces with X24. This clone of Wolverine is a pure ball of rage, akin to the escape of Logan when his moniker was Weapon X. The battle between new and old reads like every fight between Sabertooth/Deadpool and Wolverine  we want to see. Another reference that came to mind, and one that has been echo’d online quite a bit, is Terminator 2 which I think is incredibly accurate. In the last duel between them blood spills in the liters as both man and clone rend flesh from each other, one spending the last of his rage and anger to save a small girl and her friends, while the other seethes an unstoppable aura of rage and a regeneration factor to match, its clear the outcome is not in our heroes favour. Much like the performance he gives, Hugh Jackman’s death, and subsequent salvation are masterfully executed and just add to the prestige of the actor and the character. His salvation, comes at the hands of Laura, his daughter with an adamantium bullet he meant for himself, and while she robs him of a demise he thought he wanted, she gave him a peace he would have never found. The love of a child and the weight of despair lifted from his shoulders due to that love. Talking about his death chokes me up a little even now, as I have been invested in this character and mythology for over twenty five years now, and I personally find it to be the cap to a story I have been experiecing since I can remember. The final cap drives home the finality of these characters with Laura quoting the movie Shane, which she and Professor X watched in a hotel room. As she mimicks the speech that Alan Ladd’s character says to a small boy as a funeral speech, you see the similarities between new and old, not only with the movie’s character reflecting upon Logan, but upon how Logan reflects and influences Laura. As the children leave one final homage to the heroes she believed in, the X-Men, she turn his cross on the side to something simple and pure, an X

Logan in my opinion is the movie to beat this year. Not just from other comic book movies, but from films in general. It will be hard to beat the gut punch you receive as you sit with these characters, and there is a good chance the action will not be matched for years to come. As with all of my reviews (going forward) I am using a -10 to 0 score where a -10 is utter garbage and a 0 is as close to perfect as you can get.

Final Score 0

 

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